JUNE BOOK CLUB: JANE EYRE CHAPTER 1-9

Before we jump into some questions from the first 9 chapters, here’s a really interesting fact you may not have known about Jane Eyre:

There’s no small irony in the fact that the distinctly feminist Jane Eyre was originally published in 1847 under Bronte’s male pseudonym, Currer Bell. With the creation of Jane and her world, Bronte introduced an entirely new kind of heroine: Jane is “plain” and orphaned, but intelligent and proud. Bronte depicts Jane’s struggles with classism and sexism from a perspective that was almost unheard of in the 19th-century Gothic novel.THOUGHTCO.

Ok ladies, I was barely into the novel and my Mama heart was hurting.

Question 1: What emotions came up for you as you read the first part of Jane’s young life? Do you see any significance in the room she was punished to being called “THE RED ROOM?” Are there any similarities to her life and yours as a child?

“I am glad you are no relation of mine. I will never call you aunt again as long as I live. I will never come to visit you when I am grown up; and if any one asks me how I liked you, and how you treated me, I will say the very thought of you makes me sick. . . .”

Question 2: Compare the cruel treatment of the teachers at Jane’s school, and their discipline to religion, to Helen’s desire to love her enemies, practice kindness and endure hardships. Is there a message here to the reader about religion vs. Christianity?

Question 3: Like Jane being accused and punished as a LIAR, Has your character and reputation ever been damaged due to a lie being told about you? How did you handle it and were you ever vindicated?

Who else needed tissues during this reading?

Next week we will continue on with this incredible piece of literature.

With Love, Jillian

4 thoughts on “JUNE BOOK CLUB: JANE EYRE CHAPTER 1-9

  1. The emotions I felt as I read the first part was anger and sadness. Ha! I wanted to take up for her badly. The red room really reminds me of a room for anger or even hell. I don’t find similarities between Jane and nyself;However, I do see similarities in my friend Aliesas life growing up from her adoptive parents, which happens to be her biological father’s mother.
    First off, Helen was my favorite thus far in the book;needless, to say I am saddened by her death. I admired her character and would like to work harder to be that way. The teachers and the master definitely abused the bible and were quite hypocrites. Helen chose to be like Jesus and the other other than Ms Temple, were like the pharisees.
    I am not easily offended and could care less how someone sees my looks, but if I think someonequestions my character,it’s like torture to me.

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  2. **SPOILERS AHEAD**
    Question 1: What emotions came up for you as you read the first part of Jane’s young life? Do you see any significance in the room she was punished to being called “THE RED ROOM?” Are there any similarities to her life and yours as a child?

    Sadness, anger, frustration, shock. Those are the first words that come to mind to describe my emotional response to these first 9 chapters. To treat a young/small child so cruelly. I was appalled at John Reed’s treatment of Jane. At 14 years old, he is displaying all the consequences of the coddled parenting he has received. I made comparisons to Dudley Dursley from Harry Potter just now. Mrs. Reed has not a maternal bone in her body I am convinced. The Red Room sounds like fuel for the nightmare to a 10 year old child that has been so cruelly treated all her life. To my childhood personally there is very little similarity. I was loved and treated with fairness/kindness. I grew up poor which is about the only thing that I can share with Jane’s childhood upbringing.

    Compare the cruel treatment of the teachers at Jane’s school, and their discipline to religion, to Helen’s desire to love her enemies, practice kindness and endure hardships. Is there a message here to the reader about religion vs. Christianity?

    Oh sweet Helen. I was encouraged and edified by her conversation and bearing. She knew what was true even with teachers believing her a “slatter” if I’m remembering the term correctly. When she perished at the end of chapter 9 I was heartbroken for Jane but Helen’s words of comfort to her in her last hour were such a balm. I pray that I am as graceful in going home to God as Helen was.
    There is a very apparent distinction between head knowledge and living authentically for Christ. Mr. Brocklehurst for instance knew Scripture very well. But holding to the Law without having compassion and generosity made for an institution that was prison like in it’s lack of nourishment both physically and spiritually.

    Question 3: Like Jane being accused and punished as a LIAR, Has your character and reputation ever been damaged due to a lie being told about you? How did you handle it and were you ever vindicated?
    Not in the same way as Jane. I have never been subjugated to a lie that damaged my character or reputation. However, I did BELIEVE lies about myself. It was through the Word and the power of the Holy Spirit that I broke free from the lie and was able to find joy in His purpose for my life.

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  3. I am listening to the audiobook instead of reading this story. Maybe it is the tone in which it is read in the recording, but, while no child should be treated the way Jane describes her treatment at the hands of Mrs. Reed, she has struck me as a bit bratty… We are only seeing her point of view, and often children misinterpret what is happening.
    I love the contrast between Ms. Temple and the preacher and his family. While he does everything for the sake of appearances, she truly cares about the girls and wants what is best for them.

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  4. Q1: My heart hurt for Jane as she endured the cruelty she did in her young life. I kept wanting someone to come and save her!! For me the red room correlated to hell/evil as she thought she saw a ghost and knew the room gave a feeling of dread.

    Q2: I think Helen served as a turning point for Jane. Before Helen Jane may have thought herself ‘religious’ but Helen displayed true Christ likeness in her actions, thoughts and deeds. I think she helped Jane in her Christian life thru their friendship.

    Q3: doesn’t really apply 🙂

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